Scientific Assemblies

IAPSO 2003 IUGG General Assembly

 IAPSO LED SYMPOSIA

IUGG2003 General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan

 

The following listing is divided into two parts, IAPSO only symposia (symposia organized by IAPSO without participation by other IUGG Associations) and IAPSO led joint symposia (which have participation by one or more of the other Associations).


IAPSO ONLY SYMPOSIA

P01 - Western Boundary Currents

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6

Western boundary currents (WBCs) of subtropical gyres play important roles in the meridional heat and freshwater transport, and, as a consequence, global climate. The following topics will be addressed:

  • Observation and monitoring techniques for WBCs
  • Structure and dynamics of each WBC
  • Common features and differences of WBCs
  • Response of WBCs to atmospheric forcing
  • Roles of WBCs in global climate
  • Modeling WBCs
  • Predicting fluctuations of WBCs

The symposium also covers tropical and subpolar western boundary currents as well as deep western boundary currents. Selected papers from this symposium will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Oceanography.

Convenor: Shiro Imawaki, Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Japan 
Co-Convenors:
Nathan Bindoff, University of Tasmania, Australia
Donald Olson, University of Miami, USA
Alberto Piola, Servicio de Hidrografia Naval, Argentina
Johann Lutjeharms, University of Cape Town, South Africa 

P02 - Marginal and semi-enclosed seas and their exchange with the open ocean

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6
Symposium Abstracts - Session 7
Symposium Abstracts - Session 8

The circulation of marginal and semi-enclosed seas is influenced by variable bottom topography, atmospheric forcing, river runoff, and tides to varying degrees. They are rich in mesoscale variability (meandering jets, eddies, and fronts). For the marginal seas, exchange with the open ocean may be relatively rapid. Topics to be included are coastal upwelling and cool filaments, cross-shelf transport, shelf break fronts, surface and bottom boundary layers, internal waves and tides.
In some semi-enclosed seas, ventilation and deepwater formation are significant processes. In general, the renewal of the deep waters is of interest in the presence of shallow sills. For example, the ventilation processes, location, formation rates, pathways and flow rates are of interest. Because these seas are partially closed systems, they consequently have relatively slow exchange rates with the open ocean, and their unique exchange properties can lead to effects that are of special interest for biogeochemical, ecological, and fisheries oceanography studies.
Reports from observational and/or modelling studies are encouraged. The general principles controlling the circulation, exchange processes, biogeochemistry, ecology, and fisheries oceanography of these seas are sought. The following semi- enclosed regions will be covered: the Mediterranean Sea, the North- West European Seas, the Black Sea, the East China Sea, Japan (East) Sea, Sea of Okhosk, South China Sea and other similar areas. The circulation and internal tides of the marginal areas of all the major oceans are included.

Convenor: Professor John Johnson, School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom
Co-Convenors:
Prof. Christopher Mooers, Ocean Prediction Experimental Laboratory, Division of Applied Marine Physics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, USA 
Dr Masaaki Wakatsuchi, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Japan
Dr Mario Astraldi, Istituto per lo studio dell Oceanografia Fisica CNR, Italy

P03- The role of tides, mesoscale processes, and bottom topography in energy transfer and mixing

This symposium addresses processes of energy transfer and dispersion in the ocean that occupy scales smaller than the internal radius of deformation. These processes lead to turbulence through tidal energy conversion, breaking internal waves, shear from mesoscale features, and interactions between internal waves, currents and seafloor topography. Presentations on these processes and resulting mixing are welcome. These energy transfers and the resultant mixing are highly nonhomogenous in space and time.
Reports are desired on studies of the so-called "Hot Spots" where tidal conversions associated with steep seafloor topography lead to locally strong mixing. High latitude oceans, where these energy sources can be particularly significant relative to others because of an overall low energy environment, are of special interest. The convenors welcome discussion of how processes, tidal, mesoscale or small scale, lead to diapycnal or isopycnal transfers of heat, momentum and other properties both in mid-water and near boundaries. Presentations are solicited that examine the quantitative disagreement between mixing parameterizations suitable for ocean circulation models and field-derived values. Related sessions: JSM16, JSM29

Convenor: Eugene G. Morozov, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russia
Co-Convenors:
Steve A. Thorpe, SOES, Southampton, Oceanography Centre, United Kingdom
Robin D. Muench, Earth & Space Research, USA

P04 - Chemical and isotopic tracers in ocean circulation

Symposium Abstracts

Natural and artificial chemical and isotopic tracers find extensive applications in studies of surface and deep-water circulation, and in the determination of time scales of water movement and ventilation. Several oceanographic programs (including some of the major ones such as the GEOSECS, TTO and WOCE) have amply demonstrated the power of these natural (e.g. 14C, 39Ar, 32Si, 3He, Ra isotopes, Rn, Nd isotopes) and transient (3H, 14C, Chlorofluorocarbons) tracers to understand and to characterize mixing processes in the thermocline and deep waters, to determine advection-diffusion rates, air-sea exchange rates of gases, to assess simulated circulation in models and to infer paleo-circulation etc. The successful application of these tracers to derive quantitative information on water column processes depends on: (i) high precision measurements of their distribution, (ii) characterization of various processes contributing to their distribution in the water column, and (iii) development of appropriate models to describe their distribution. For several of these tracers, their involvement in biogeochemical interactions is an important characteristic, which influences their distribution in the water column. Significant advances have been made in all of the three aspects mentioned above, which has placed the application of these tracers for studying present and past ocean circulation on a firm footing.
The goal of the symposium is to discuss current trends in the use of chemical & isotopic tracers in ocean circulation with emphasis on how they have enhanced our understanding of circulation within and among various oceanic basins, the pathways of circulation and mixing, the associated processes, and their rates. How realistic the tracer-based models are, and how well they mesh with our present day knowledge of physical, chemical and biological processes in the oceans?
A special focus of the symposium would be on new developments in tracer measurements and modeling. It is hoped that an outcome of the symposium would be a projection of visions for future developments in tracer applications, techniques and modeling.

Convenor: Prof. Devandra Lal, Scripps Institution of Oceanography-UCSD, Geosciences Research Division, USA 
Co-Convenors:
Andrew Watson, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

P05 - The Physical Oceanography of the Indian Ocean

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4

During and after the WOCE period, a significant number of observational and model studies have been carried out on the Indian Ocean circulation and dynamics. The scope of the symposium is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the physical oceanography and air-sea interaction of the Indian Ocean, especially water mass distributions and pathways, monsoon-driven processes and upwelling, subduction and ventilation, thermohaline overturning circulation and associated heat and freshwater transports, exchanges with the Pacific and Atlantic, equatorial waves and the role ofthe ocean in intraseasonal to interannual climate anomalies. We encourage presentations on these subjects, but also on interdisciplinary areas such as the influence of advection and mixing in contributing to variations in primary productivity. It is planned to publish a collection of papers in a peer- reviewed journal.

Convenor: Fritz Schott, Institut für Meereskunde, University of Kiel, Germany
Co-Convenors:
Jay McCreary, University of Hawaii, USA
Johann Lutjeharms, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Satish Shetye, National Institute of Oceanography, India

P06 - The Southern Ocean (IAPSO/SCOR/SCAR)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5

Recent research programs have focused on observations and modeling of the physical, chemical, and biological oceanography of the Southern Ocean. We encourage presentation of these results to increase understanding of the linkages between circulation and biological processes, and the roles of summer and winter processes, sea ice, topography, nutrient limitation, and ocean-ice- atmospheric interactions in the Southern Ocean. The session will discuss processes associated with Southern Ocean food webs, sea ice dynamics, water mass formation, export from the Antarctic to the global ocean, and dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and Antarctic Circumpolar Wave. We invite discussion of seasonal, interannual and decadal variability. This forum will foster continued multidisciplinary research into Antarctic oceanographic processes.
Convenor: Karen Heywood (IAPSO), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom 
Co-Convenors:
Eileen Hofmann (SCOR), Center for Coastal Physical, Oceanography, USA 
Zhaoqian Dong (SCAR), Polar Research Institute of China, China


 
 IAPSO-LED JOINT SYMPOSIA

JSP01 - The decadal to centennial variability of the ocean and atmosphere (IAPSO/IAMAS/CLIVAR)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6

Several climatic variations on decadal to centennial timescales have recently been identified in the ocean and atmosphere. Decadal variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation are some examples. Various theories for these long-term modes of variability have been proposed including internal oceanic or atmospheric variability, an air-sea coupled mode associated with a delayed oscillator with or without interaction between the mid-latitudes and tropics, oceanic resonant responses to stochastic atmospheric forcings. Observational, modeling, analysis, and prediction studies that address global or regional decadal-to-centennial phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere are welcomed.
Related sessions: JSP02, JSP04, JSP06, JSM01

Convenor: Shoshiro Minobe (IAPSO), Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Hokkaido University, Japan
Co-Convenors:
Richard A. Wood (IAMAS), Ocean Model Validation and Techniques, Met Office, Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, United Kingdom 
David S. Battisti (CLIVAR), Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, USA

JSP02 - New Perspectives of Coupled Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Predictability (IAPSO, IAMAS, CLIVAR)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6

New perspectives on ocean-atmosphere interactions have been developing on several fronts, including the importance of salinity stratification, the Indian Ocean coupled variability and the Atlantic interhemispheric gradient of SST, interaction of the Subtropical Cell with equatorial processes, the Indonesian Throughflow, and the rectified effects of coupling on intraseasonal time scales. These aspects of coupled ocean-atmosphere system have a variety ofimplications concerning the predictability of tropical SST and atmospheric diabatic heating variations, and the predictability of tropical-subtropical interactions. This symposium is proposed to harness current activities in order to shed light on the new perspectives.
Related sessions: JSP02, JSP06

Convenor: Toshio Yamagata, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Co-Convenors:
Antonio J. Busalacchi, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, USA
Roger Lukas, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, USA
Bin Wang, International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii, USA

JSP03 - Groundwater Inputs to the Ocean (IAPSO, IAHS)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3

The process of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now recognized as significant for water and material pathways from the land to the ocean. The study of the chemical and ecological effects of SGD in the coastal zone is an emerging science. This session will focus on physical, chemical and biological aspects of SGD and will be hosted by a new joint commission on Groundwater-Seawater Interactions. Papers are invited on relevant topics, including submarine groundwater discharge, environmental, and ecological effects in estuaries and coastal zones, as well as other subjects related to groundwater-seawater interactions.
Related sessions: JSH03

Convenor: Evgueni A. Kontar (IAPSO), P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russia 
Co-Convenors:
William C. Burnett (IAPSO), Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, USA 
Makoto Taniguchi (IAHS), Department of Earth Sciences, Nara University of Education, Japan
Toshitaka Gama (Japanese National Committee), Division of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Japan

JSP04 - Arctic Environmental Change (IAPSO/IAMAS/IAHS)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6

The Arctic has experienced rapid change during the last few decades: i.e., reduction of sea ice extent, the intensification of the Polar Vortex, an increase in cloud cover, and deteriorating permafrost. A significant reduction of the North Atlantic Deep Water formation and an increase in Atlantic Water underneath the Arctic Halocline may be tied to these changes as well. Papers are invited with the foci on (1) the signals from and roles of the ocean and land surface influenced by the atmosphere and/or their feedback to the atmosphere, (2) the mechanisms and consequences of ocean-land interactions through the atmosphere and rivers, (3) oceanic and terrestrial chemical tracer studies, (4) interactions with biosphere and geochemical processes, and (5) paleoclimatic studies.
Related session: JSM10

Convenor: Prof. Motoyoshi Ikeda, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Japan
Co-Convenors:
Prof. Lawrence A. Mysak, McGill University, IAMAS
Dr. Manfred A. Lange, University of Muenster, IAHS

JSP05 - Worldwide Sea Level Change (IAPSO, IAG)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3

This session is concerned with the techniques for monitoring the time and space scales of mean and extreme sea level changes worldwide and the scientific findings based on those observations and other in situ data. Techniques for sea level measurement include tide gauges and satellite radar altimetry while those for land movements include GPS and DORIS. These different methods for sea and land level monitoring are especially complementary in the fields of long term sea level change due to climate change, and in the ongoing calibration of altimetry by means of tide gauges. The symposium will, therefore, include a special session on the monitoring of tide gauge benchmarks by means of new geodetic techniques (especially GPS), following on from other successful earlier workshops in the field.
Related session: JSM11

Convenors: Christian Le Provost, Laboratoire d'Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France
Co-convenors:
Philip Woodworth, Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory, United Kingdom
Michael Bevis, University of Hawaii, USA

JSP06 - The Global Ocean Observing System (IAPSO/IAG/IOC)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4

The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) is being designed and implemented as a sustained and integrated system based on user needs. This is an end-to-end system, ranging from observations to needed products and services, and integrating all disciplinary areas. The strategic design and initial implementation are proceeding as two coordinated modules: one for climate and marine services, and one for coastal GOOS. This session focuses on the climate and marine services module of GOOS.
Presentations are solicited that review its observing system components. These include both remote and in situ observations (e.g., Argo floats, XBT observations including low and high density lines, the ENSO observing system, satellite altimetry, sea surface temperature from satellites, or scatterometers) and the way such observations are, or can be, integrated (e.g., through data assimilation techniques as planned by the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment).
Assessments of the value and utility of the observing system for different applications are particularly encouraged. Descriptions of the potential for new in-situ and remote sensing techniques also are welcome.
Related session: JSP07

Convenor: Pierre-Yves Le Traon, CLS Space Oceanography Division, France
Co-Convenors:
Gustavo Goni, United States Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, USA
Worth D. Nowlin, Jr., Department of Oceanography, 3146 Texas A&M University, USA
Hans-Peter Plag, Norwegian Mapping Authority Geodetic Institute, Norway

JSP07 - The Coastal Ocean Observing System (IAPSO, IAG, IOC)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3

The need for good predictions of coastal ocean response to natural and anthropogenic forcings requires the development of dynamical, biogeochemical, and ecological models which simulate processes with high spatial resolution on temporal scales from hours to decades and longer. This in turn requires observational datasets which can provide initial and boundary conditions, time series data on short to long time scales for validation of model predictions, and innovative data which address the processes and interactions that govern biogeochemical transformations and ecosystem functioning. The symposium will focus on the current state-of-the-art of whole shelf and coastal models with emphasis on recent progress in holistic modelling (including data assimilation), interdisciplinary data collection and analysis, end-user products, and identification of prediction-limiting factors in current models.
Related sessions: JSM03, JSP08

Convenor: Colin Jago, School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales Bangor, United Kingdom
Co-convenors:
Joana Fernandes, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Observatorio Astronomico, Portugal 
Thorkild Aarup, Programme Specialist, GOOS Project Office, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), UNESCO, France

JSP08 - Coastal Processes and Storm Surges (IAPSO/IAMAS/LOICZ (IGBP))

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3

This symposium will discuss the coastal processes such as current systems, mixing and material transport, intense sediment transport and resultant morphodynamic responses, especially related to storm surges. The topics include storm-driven currents, change of stratification patterns, episodic material transport, barrier breaching, inlet migration, cross-shore and longshore sediment transport, system behaviour of coastal sedimentary environments and their roles in the whole coastal processes. Papers of field observations and numerical experiments are welcome.
Related sessions: JSP3, JSP6, JSP9, P2, P3

Convenor: Tetsuo Yanagi, Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Japan
Co-Convenors:
Shu Gao, Nanjing University, China
Andrew Short, University of Sydney, Australia

JSP09 - Physical Aspects of Air-Sea Interaction (IAPSO, IAMAS)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4

The transfers of heat, freshwater and momentum between the atmosphere and the ocean are fundamental processes within the global climate system. Recent progress in our understanding of these fluxes using satellite datasets, in situ observations and model output will be considered. Papers are invited on methods of flux estimation and validation, intercomparison studies and the application of flux datasets to the study of atmospheric and ocean properties at all spatial scales. There will be three sub-sections: i.) Air-Sea Exchanges From Surface Observations And Numerical Models ii.) Air-Sea Exchanges From Remote Sensing iii.) Mesoscale Air-Sea Interactions During Strong Winds.
Related sessions: JSM02

Convenor: Simon A. Josey, James Rennell Division, Southampton Oceanography Centre, United Kingdom
Co-Convenors:
Naoto Ebuchi, Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies, Tohoku University, Japan
Nick (Lynn) K. Shay, Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, USA

JSP10 - Rotating and Stratified Fluids (IAPSO, IAMAS, IAGA, SEDI)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4
Symposium Abstracts - Session 5
Symposium Abstracts - Session 6
Symposium Abstracts - Session 7
Symposium Abstracts - Session 8

During the past decades an increasing number of scientists have devoted their interests to model large and meso-scale ocean and atmosphere flows. Only recently, ocean and atmosphere models have improved to such an extent that they are capable of running with less artificial diffusion and instead require better parameterisations of many fundamental flow processes, such as near boundary flows, vortex motions, wave motions and mixing. In this framework, we invite theoretical, numerical and experimental contributions that advance the fundamental understanding of geophysical flows. In particular we welcome studies on (i) coherent vortex motions and their mutual interaction (ii) vortex interaction with mean flows, waves or topography (iii) waves and interaction with mean currents (iv) boundary flows (v) rotating and/or stratified turbulence (vi) mixing by turbulence or vortices.

Convenors: Jan-Bert Flor, LEGI, Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysique et Industriels, France
Co-convenors: George Carnevale, UCSD, USA
Harindra Fernando, ASU, USA
Evgueni Ermanyuk, LIH, Russia
Rudolf Kloosterziel, SOEST, USA
James Riley, University of Washington, USA
Marius Ungarish, Israel (TECHNION)

JSP11 - Geophysical Risk and Vulnerability: the population-hazard interaction (IAPSO with IASPEI, IAHS, IAMAS, IAGA, IAVCEI)

Symposium Abstracts - Session 1
Symposium Abstracts - Session 2
Symposium Abstracts - Session 3
Symposium Abstracts - Session 4

Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, floods, droughts, tsunamis, storm surges, wildfires, tropical cyclones, tornadoes and extreme space weather events become major societal risks when they impinge on vulnerable populations. The growth in world population, its urbanization, and the possibility of climate change and global climate change exacerbate the vulnerability. Factors increasing vulnerability also include increased resources in newly developing areas, increased cost and complexity of urban infrastructure, and the technical and social interdependencies of infrastructure systems. There is thus an urgent need to understand the present and future vulnerability of populations to geophysical hazards and to ascertain the best ways to mitigate physical, social and economic impact.

Convenor: Tom Beer, CSIRO Environmental Risk Network, Australia
Co-Convenors:
Grant Heiken, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, USA
Alik Ismail-Zadeh, International Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Math Geophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
Viacheslav Gusiakov, Tsunami Laboratory, Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics, Russia
A.W. Jayawardena, Dept. Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Chen Yong, State Seismological Bureau, PRC
David Boteler, Geomagnetic Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada,
Canada
Evgueni Kontar, P.P. Shirsov Institute of Oceanology, Russia
John Schneider, (Geohazards and Risk Research Group), Geoscience Australia, Australia
William H. Hooke, Senior Policy Fellow and Director, Atmospheric Policy Program, American Meteorological Society, USA