Scientific Assemblies

IAPSO 2003 IUGG General Assembly

 

IAPSO LED SYMPOSIA

IUGG2003 General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan

 

The following listing is divided into two parts, IAPSO only symposia (symposia organized by IAPSO without participation by other IUGG Associations) and IAPSO led joint symposia (which have participation by one or more of the other Associations).

IAPSO ONLY SYMPOSIA

  • P01 Western Boundary Currents

    Western boundary currents (WBCs) of subtropical gyres play important roles in the meridional heat and freshwater transport, and, as a consequence, global climate. The following topics will be addressed:

    Observation and monitoring techniques for WBCs
    Structure and dynamics of each WBC
    Common features and differences of WBCs
    Response of WBCs to atmospheric forcing
    Roles of WBCs in global climate
    Modeling WBCs
    Predicting fluctuations of WBCs


  • The symposium also covers tropical and subpolar western boundary currents as well as deep western boundary currents. Selected papers from this symposium will be published in a special issue of the Journal of Oceanography.
    Convenor: Shiro Imawaki, Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580,
    Japan Phone: +81-92-583-7736; Fax: +81-92-584-2570;
    email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Co-Convenors:
    Nathan Bindoff, University of Tasmania, Australia
    Donald Olson, University of Miami, USA
    Alberto Piola, Servicio de Hidrografia Naval, Argentina
    Johann Lutjeharms, University of Cape Town, South Africa

 

  • P02- Marginal and semi-enclosed seas and their exchange with the open ocean.

    The circulation of marginal and semi-enclosed seas is influenced by variable bottom topography, atmospheric forcing, river runoff, and tides to varying degrees. They are rich in mesoscale variability (meandering jets, eddies, and fronts). For the marginal seas, exchange with the open ocean may be relatively rapid. Topics to be included are coastal upwelling and cool filaments, cross-shelf transport, shelf break fronts, surface and bottom boundary layers, internal waves and tides.
    In some semi-enclosed seas, ventilation and deepwater formation are significant processes. In general, the renewal of the deep waters is of interest in the presence of shallow sills. For example, the ventilation processes, location, formation rates, pathways and flow rates are of interest. Because these seas are partially closed systems, they consequently have relatively slow exchange rates with the open ocean, and their unique exchange properties can lead to effects that are of special interest for biogeochemical, ecological, and fisheries oceanography studies.
    Reports from observational and/or modelling studies are encouraged. The general principles controlling the circulation, exchange processes, biogeochemistry, ecology, and fisheries oceanography of these seas are sought. The following semi- enclosed regions will be covered: the Mediterranean Sea, the North- West European Seas, the Black Sea, the East China Sea, Japan (East) Sea, Sea of Okhosk, South China Sea and other similar areas. The circulation and internal tides of the marginal areas of all the major oceans are included.

    Convenor: Professor John Johnson, School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK; Phone 44 1603 592598, Fax 44 1603 593868,
    e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Co-Convenors:
    Prof. Christopher Mooers, Ocean Prediction Experimental Laboratory, Division of Applied Marine Physics, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149-1098, USA; Phone 305-361-4088, Fax 305-361-4797,
    e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Dr Masaaki Wakatsuchi, Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Japan; Phone 011-706-5480, Fax 011-706-7142,
    email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Dr Mario Astraldi, Istituto per lo studio dell Oceanografia Fisica CNR; Forte S. Teresa 19036 Pozzuolo di Lerici (La Spezia), Italy; Phone 0039 0187 978301, Fax 0039 0187 970585
    e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

  • P03- The role of tides, mesoscale processes, and bottom topography in energy transfer and mixing

    This symposium addresses processes of energy transfer and dispersion in the ocean that occupy scales smaller than the internal radius of deformation. These processes lead to turbulence through tidal energy conversion, breaking internal waves, shear from mesoscale features, and interactions between internal waves, currents and seafloor topography. Presentations on these processes and resulting mixing are welcome. These energy transfers and the resultant mixing are highly nonhomogenous in space and time.
    Reports are desired on studies of the so-called "Hot Spots" where tidal conversions associated with steep seafloor topography lead to locally strong mixing. High latitude oceans, where these energy sources can be particularly significant relative to others because of an overall low energy environment, are of special interest. The convenors welcome discussion of how processes, tidal, mesoscale or small scale, lead to diapycnal or isopycnal transfers of heat, momentum and other properties both in mid-water and near boundaries. Presentations are solicited that examine the quantitative disagreement between mixing parameterizations suitable for ocean circulation models and field-derived values. Related sessions: JSM16, JSM29

    Convenor: Eugene G. Morozov, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, 36 Nakhimovsky Street, 117851, Moscow, Russia; Phone: 7 (095) 917-35-76; Fax: 7 (095) 124 59 83;
    email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Co-Convenors:
    Steve A. Thorpe*, SOES, Southampton, Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK.
    e-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    (*present address: Bodfryn, Glanrafon, Llangoed, Anglesey LL58 8PH, UK).
    Robin D. Muench, Earth & Space Research, 1910 Fairview Ave. E, #102, Seattle, WA 98102-3620, USA;
    e-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

  • P04 Chemical and isotopic tracers in ocean circulation

    Symposium Abstracts

    Natural and artificial chemical and isotopic tracers find extensive applications in studies of surface and deep-water circulation, and in the determination of time scales of water movement and ventilation. Several oceanographic programs (including some of the major ones such as the GEOSECS, TTO and WOCE) have amply demonstrated the power of these natural (e.g. 14C, 39Ar, 32Si, 3He, Ra isotopes, Rn, Nd isotopes) and transient (3H, 14C, Chlorofluorocarbons) tracers to understand and to characterize mixing processes in the thermocline and deep waters, to determine advection-diffusion rates, air-sea exchange rates of gases, to assess simulated circulation in models and to infer paleo-circulation etc. The successful application of these tracers to derive quantitative information on water column processes depends on: (i) high precision measurements of their distribution, (ii) characterization of various processes contributing to their distribution in the water column, and (iii) development of appropriate models to describe their distribution. For several of these tracers, their involvement in biogeochemical interactions is an important characteristic, which influences their distribution in the water column. Significant advances have been made in all of the three aspects mentioned above, which has placed the application of these tracers for studying present and past ocean circulation on a firm footing.
    The goal of the symposium is to discuss current trends in the use of chemical & isotopic tracers in ocean circulation with emphasis on how they have enhanced our understanding of circulation within and among various oceanic basins, the pathways of circulation and mixing, the associated processes, and their rates. How realistic the tracer-based models are, and how well they mesh with our present day knowledge of physical, chemical and biological processes in the oceans?
    A special focus of the symposium would be on new developments in tracer measurements and modeling. It is hoped that an outcome of the symposium would be a projection of visions for future developments in tracer applications, techniques and modeling.
    Convenor: Prof. Devandra Lal, Scripps Institution of Oceanography-UCSD, Geosciences Research Division, 0244, La Jolla CA, 92093-0244; Tel (858) 534-2134; Fax (858) 822-3310;
    e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Co-Convenors:
    Andrew Watson, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK;
    email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

  • P05 - The Physical Oceanography of the Indian Ocean

    During and after the WOCE period, a significant number of observational and model studies have been carried out on the Indian Ocean circulation and dynamics. The scope of the symposium is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the physical oceanography and air-sea interaction of the Indian Ocean, especially water mass distributions and pathways, monsoon-driven processes and upwelling, subduction and ventilation, thermohaline overturning circulation and associated heat and freshwater transports, exchanges with the Pacific and Atlantic, equatorial waves and the role ofthe ocean in intraseasonal to interannual climate anomalies. We encourage presentations on these subjects, but also on interdisciplinary areas such as the influence of advection and mixing in contributing to variations in primary productivity. It is planned to publish a collection of papers in a peer- reviewed journal.

    Convenor: Fritz Schott, Institut f